Back To Listing

Australians who work longer hours listen to more radio

Source: Roy Morgan Single Source, January to December 2016, sample = 50,144 Australians aged 14+

Heigh-ho, heigh-ho, it’s time for radio! Almost four in 10 Australian employees say radio is an important part of their daily routine, Roy Morgan Research shows—and the more we work, the more we listen.

7.2 million Australians aged 14+ (36 percent) agree that “radio is an important part of my daily routine”. People working full time are the most likely to make a daily habit of radio (41 percent), just ahead of retirees (40 percent), and part-time workers (35 percent).

Tuning in to the radio each day is less of a ritual among Australians without a job: 29 percent of people on ‘home duties’ or who simply ‘don’t work’ agree it’s an important part of their daily routine, ahead of 27 percent of people who are unemployed and looking for a job, and 23 percent of non-working students.

Percent who agree, “Radio is an important part of my daily routine”


Source: Roy Morgan Single Source, January to December 2016, sample = 50,144 Australians aged 14+

Whistling while we work

The average Australian employee spends almost two and a half hours (147 minutes) listening to radio on an average weekday. This is half an hour more than people who aren’t employed (114 minutes).

Furthermore, increasing time spent at work correlates to more time spent listening to radio: from 126 minutes per weekday on average among people who put in up to 15 hours a week, rising to 172 minutes a day among the nearly million Australians who work 51 or more hours a week.

Average time spent listening to radio on a normal weekday

Source: Roy Morgan Single Source, January to December 2016, sample = 50,144 Australians aged 14+

Michele Levine, CEO – Roy Morgan Research, says:

“For many working Australians, radio is an important part of their daily routine. Many employees are tuned in to radio during their working hours—whether it’s streamed through a desktop or personal device, heard over speakers in the retail store, bar or restaurant, or playing all day on a construction site.

“Not only does this give radio a distinct edge in terms of reach, but a potentially more valuable audience. Full-time workers who say radio is an important part of their daily routine earn over $6,000 more per year on average than other full-time employees.”

For comments or more information please contact:
Roy Morgan - Enquiries
Office: (+61) (03) 9224 5309
askroymorgan@roymorgan.com


About Roy Morgan

Roy Morgan is the largest independent Australian research company, with offices throughout Australia, as well as in Indonesia, the United States and the United Kingdom. A full service research organisation specialising in omnibus and syndicated data, Roy Morgan has over 70 years’ experience in collecting objective, independent information on consumers.

Margin of Error

The margin of error to be allowed for in any estimate depends mainly on the number of interviews on which it is based. Margin of error gives indications of the likely range within which estimates would be 95% likely to fall, expressed as the number of percentage points above or below the actual estimate. Allowance for design effects (such as stratification and weighting) should be made as appropriate.

Sample Size

Percentage Estimate

40%-60%

25% or 75%

10% or 90%

5% or 95%

5,000

±1.4

±1.2

±0.8

±0.6

7,500

±1.1

±1.0

±0.7

±0.5

10,000

±1.0

±0.9

±0.6

±0.4

20,000

±0.7

±0.6

±0.4

±0.3

50,000

±0.4

±0.4

±0.3

±0.2